Video

Force Fitted Data Science Projects Won’t Work Beyond Pilots

Dr. Avik Sarkar on Using Data Science for Business Growth and Social Good
Dr. Avik Sarkar, visiting associate professor for data, technology and public policy, Indian School of Business

As organizations begin to utilize data into working for them, few are able to succeed in their data-driven ambitions. In fact, majority of data science projects don’t make it to production. In a study, though dated, Gartner estimates this number at 85%. The reason behind the low success rate is the tendency to force fit technology.

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CIOs should adopt a problem-solving mindset. "Businesses are there to make money and not to prove that a technology works. Therefore, the fitment of technology back to the business problem is very important. Not every project is a candidate for data science. Force fitting the technology often doesn’t work beyond the proof of concept and pilots," says Dr. Avik Sarkar, visiting associate professor for data, technology and public policy, Indian School of Business (ISB).

In this interview with Information Security Media Group, Dr. Sarkar discusses:

  • How CIOs and IT leaders should approach data science projects within their organizations;
  • How does a data-driven approach work for an "impact ecosystem";
  • AI use cases at scale and how they can bring about decisive change.

Dr. Sarkar has been working extensively on the various aspects of data and emerging technologies for governance and public policy, along with research in the interaction of society and technology and data for social good.


About the Author

Shipra Malhotra

Shipra Malhotra

Managing Editor, ISMG

Malhotra has more than two decades of experience in technology journalism and public relations. She has been writing on enterprise technology and security-related issues. She has also worked at Biztech2.com, Dataquest and The Indian Express.




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